Annemarie Torcivia - RE/MAX  Trinity



Posted by Annemarie Torcivia on 5/15/2017

It's many homeowners' worst fear to come home to a water disaster in their home. Water damage can cost thousands to repair and will include a lengthy process in order to adhere to safety standards, potentially disrupting your home life for weeks. In this article we'll give you tips on how to avoid water damage and what to do when you discover it.

Water damage vs. flood damage

Many people are unaware of the difference between water damage and flood damage. Water damage can occur when you have plumbing issues such as a leaking pipe or overflowing bath tub. Flood damage, on the other hand, is defined by FEMA as an "overflow of inland or tidal waters, unusual and rapid accumulation or runoff of surface waters," or even mudflow. Flood damage tends to be the more costly and the more dangerous of the two, as it puts home inhabitants at serious health risk. Part of the stipulation in differing between the two types of damage is insurance coverage; water damage is often covered by homeowner's insurance whereas flood damage is not.

Avoiding water damage

To avoid costly and time-consuming repairs, follow these steps to prevent water damage from occurring in your home:
  • Keep your gutters clean to avoid backups and drainage issues
  • divert rain water away from your house with downspouts
  • Disconnect hoses and turn off their water supply when temperatures drop to freezing overnight
  • Don't leave water using appliances running while you are away from home for extended periods of time
  • Keep up with maintenance on your dishwasher, washing machine, toilets, and tubs
  • Turn off your water main when you go away on vacations
  • Check the water pressure to your home. High water pressure can be nice in the shower, but pressures too high can cause your plumbing to fail
  • Check regularly for leaks. Some water damage may go unnoticed for weeks or months, which subjects you to another danger: mold

What to do if you have water damage in your home

If it's too late for prevention and you've discovered water damage in your home there are several steps you'll need to take to ensure the safety of your home.
  • Turn off electronics in the affected area. If possible switch off power to whole the whole section of your home at the circuit breaker. This first step is to ensure your own safety. Once you've turned off power to all potentially dangerous electronics, you can move on to the next step.
  • Remove electronics and other perishable items from the area. If you remove the items soon enough you might be able to salvage them by drying them out.
  • Soak up the bulk of the water. You can do this the old fashion way by using towels and buckets. Or you can use a wet/dry vacuum cleaner to suck up the water from rugs, carpets, and other surfaces.
  • Dry the area completely. To avoid mold, use fans and a dehumidifier to fully dry out the area.
  • Disinfect. Spray the area to remove any bacteria that may have accumulated due to moisture.
  • Contact the professionals. A contractor will be able to tell you the full extent of the damage and whether any serious repairs will need to me made.
 





Posted by Annemarie Torcivia on 5/10/2017

This Commercial in Malden, MA recently sold for $175,000. This style home was sold by Annemarie Torcivia - RE/MAX Trinity.


485 Lynn St, Malden, MA 02148

Linden

Commercial

$199,900
Price
$175,000
Sale Price

1
Buildings
Commercial
Type of Comm.
1,080.00
Lot Size
Attention small business owners ! Perfect location for your neighborhood business. Why pay rent, when you can own. Brick building with new sub flooring, heat and AC. High traffic count and visibility. Municipal parking lot for 25 cars directly across the street. Public transportation on corner. Easily accessible from Rte 1 and 1A. Zoned neighborhood business . Buyer to do due dilligence for licensing and permits .






Tags: Malden   Real Estate   Commercial   02148  
Categories: Sold Homes  


Posted by Annemarie Torcivia on 5/8/2017

Chemicals, metals and other household products in your home could be making you sick. Harmful products and chemicals at your house could also be creating illness symptoms in your children, pets and house guests. Keep reading to learn about some common ways that your house could be making you sick.

Overlooked and common household dangers

Lead paint can cause you to feel nauseous, constipated and sick to your stomach. Check the amount of lead in paint before you start decorating. If you exhibit symptoms,check the amount of lead in the existing paint at your house.

High mercury levels - Too much mercury in your home can cause metal poisoning. Symptoms of metal poisoning vary from person to person, but can include numbness, difficulty walking or standing, muscle weakness and poor vision. Mercury poisoning can also cause memory and cognitive thinking impairment.

You can become over exposed to mercury by eating certain types of fish. Mercury overexposure can also be derived from chemicals that you keep in your home. The Environmental Protection Agency shares that you can come in contact with mercury several ways, including by breathing in the metal. You can also ingest mercury into your system by touching products that have mercury in them and by eating foods that contain mercury. Batteries, thermometers, certain light bulbs, some vaccines, skin creams and jewelry are types of products that contain mercury.

Allergens – Pet hairs are a major cause of allergens. If you or someone in your family coughs, wheezes or sneezes every time they are around your dog or cat, visit the doctor and have test run to see if you or your family member is allergic to your pet.

Are any of these dangers at your house?

  • Poor ventilation
  • Dust mites
  • Asbestos
  • Carbon monoxide generally becomes dangerous for humans after carbon monoxide reaches levels of 100 ppm or higher.
  • Mold
  • Leaking roof
  • Pests
  • Old food

Take quick action if someone becomes ill at your house

Contact your physician immediately should you suspect that you, a family member or guest at your home has become ill due to coming into contact with a chemical or product in your house. Avoid assuming that just because you have never become ill in your home that means that no one else could be allergic or become ill to a product or chemical in your house.

For example, you might not be allergic to peanuts. However, a colleague or friend who visits your house could become dangerously ill if he is exposed to peanut butter or another peanut food product that you store or prepare a meal with at your house.

Share as many details as possible with physicians and nurses at the hospital or urgent clinic that you visit. Tell them when the person started to show signs of illness. Also, tell the medical professional or emergency technician what you ate. If you live near a landfill, share this information with medical professionals as well. The more details that you share with medical staff, the sooner the staff can narrow what may have caused the symptoms. Information that you share can also make it easier for medical staff to start treating you or another person who becomes ill at your home.





Posted by Annemarie Torcivia on 5/1/2017

Buying a home is one of the biggest decisions you will make in your life, financially and otherwise. When you buy a home you're deciding on the region you want to live in, where you might want to raise children, and the people you'll live around for likely many years. You're also signing up for all of the responsibilities that come with a home: utility bills, issues and repairs, cleaning the house, maintaining the yard... the list goes on. So, before plunging into a mortgage, check off all the items on this checklist to determine if you're ready for home ownership.

The First Time Home Buyer's Checklist:

  1. I know where I want to live. Determining the location of your home is one of the most important factors that goes into home buying. Most decisions are influenced by your job/career, but things like family, friends and weather are all important things to consider. Aside from knowing where you want to live, you'll also need to know how long you want to stay. As a general rule, if you don't plan on staying in your home for at least 5-8 years it could be cheaper and easier to rent until you find somewhere you'd like to settle in.
  2. I have my finances under control. You don't need to be wealthy to buy a home, but you do need to have a strong understanding of your personal finances. In a spreadsheet, write down your total savings, monthly income and monthly expenses (including groceries, transportation, bills, and loans). Find out what type of mortgage and downpayment you can afford at your income level.
  3. My income is dependable. When you apply for a home loan the bank will look into this for you. But you should also want to make sure you can continue to afford your mortgage payments. How dependable is your job? Are there a lot of job opportunities in your field and in your area? These are all questions that help you determine the stability of your income.
  4. I have a good credit score. Your credit will be a big factor in getting approved for a home loan. Building credit seems complicated but it's based on four main things: paying bills on time, keeping balances relatively low, having a long record of repayment, and not opening several new cards or taking on multiple loans in a short period of time.
  5. I'm pre-approved for a loan. Getting pre-approved isn't mandatory, but it offers many benefits. First, it shows lenders that you are a safe person to loan money to. Second, it will give you insight into what banks think of your finances and will give you an idea of what price range you can safely buy in.
  6. I'm prepared for the responsibilities of owning a home and willing to learn. If you're handy around the house and can fix anything, that's great. What's more important, however, is that you have the time and willingness to learn new skills that will help you become a good homeowner.





Posted by Annemarie Torcivia on 4/24/2017

A house fire is a parent and home owner's worst fear. Many people see tragic house fires as a case of very bad luck, but in reality most house fires can be avoided by practicing good fire safety. To prevent house fires and to know what to do in case you have one, you'll need to learn and teach your children about the main causes of house fires, how to prevent them, and what to do when a fire occurs. We'll cover all of that in this article, plus give you some tips on making it easy and fun for kids to learn.

How do house fires happen?

The eight most common causes of house fires are:
  1. candles
  2. smoking
  3. electrical/lighting
  4. dryers and washing machines
  5. lightning
  6. kids playing with fire
  7. tree decorations
  8. kitchen/cooking

Play investigator

To prevent some of the causes of fire listed above, gather your children and put on your investigator hat. Make a checklist of the following and scour your house together to search for clues of fire hazards, taking care of them as you go along. Look for:
  • Overloaded power strips and damaged power cords
  • Dryer vents that are clogged up or dirty
  • Stove burners that are near flammable items like curtains
  • Smoke detectors checked
  • Extra batteries located
  • Escape route noted (see below)
  • Ensure kids know the rules about candles, cooking, playing with fire, etc.

Plan your escape

Teaching kids a fire escape route can be tricky. It might get confusing for them or they might forget or panic in case of an actual fire. Therefore the best way to teach kids a fire escape plan is to practice it often. Have monthly or bi-monthly fire safety checks with your kids and go over your escape plan and test your smoke detectors. Yearly, participate in fire safety week, which also covers escape plans and best practices but turns it into a weeklong series of activities you can do with your kids. When it comes to the actual fire escape plan, grab some graphing paper and colored pencils and sit down with your kids to create your home. Include in your plan the names and escape routes (2 minimum) of each room and the outdoor meeting place. Have kids draw their own (age appropriate) to help them understand the plan better and get them involved. Once you've drawn the plan, run through it a few times with your kids. If you have infants or very young children who can't get themselves out of the house, plan who will retrieve them from their room in case of a fire. Remember to tell the kids not to wait for others before getting outside, and to not try to take belongings with them.

Stick to your routine

The hardest part about fire safety is making it a habit. At school, your kids have mandatory fire drills. At home, however, parents get busy with work or forget and tend to ignore fire safety. So, you'll have to find ways to make sure you and your family stick to the plan. If you have a family calendar hanging in your home, make sure you pencil in your bi-monthly fire safety meeting. Similarly, anyone in your family who uses a calendar on their phone or computer should add it there as well and invite the other family members. Make sure the event is fun for everyone to ensure no one dreads it. You could make a plan to take the kids out to dinner or somewhere fun after to make it a night everyone looks forward to every couple of months.