Annemarie Torcivia - RE/MAX  Trinity



Posted by Annemarie Torcivia on 1/13/2020

Getting a professional inspection is one of the most important parts of closing on a home. An inspection can save you endless time and money if it catches repairs that need to be made, and it can draw your attention to any problems that could be dangerous to you and your family.

Many buyers, especially those who are buying a home for the first time, aren’t sure what to expect during a home inspection. They might have questions that they’re afraid to ask the inspector, or they might feel like they should be asking questions but don’t know the right ones to ask.

In this article, we’ll give you the rundown on the home inspection process. We’ll explain how to get started, what to expect on inspection day, and what to do with your findings.

Contingency clauses

Before closing on a home, it’s important to make sure your offer involves a contingency clause, otherwise known as a “due diligence contingency.” This section of your contract gives you the right to perform a home inspection within a given number of days.

Sellers may inform you that they have recently had the home inspected and even offer to show you the results of the inspection. However, it is best practice to have your own inspection performed with a trusted professional.

After your offer is accepted, you should begin calling and getting quotes from inspectors immediately.

Before the inspection

Once you’ve considered your options of inspectors and chosen an inspector, it’s time to schedule your inspection. Both you and your real estate agent should attend the inspection.

You’ll both have the opportunity to ask questions. However, it’s a good idea to write down your minor questions and ask them before or after the inspection so that the professional you’ve hired is able to focus on their work to do the best possible job inspecting your future home.

During the inspection

The inspection itself is pretty straightforward. Your inspector will examine the exterior and interior of your home, including several vital components and then will provide you with a report of their findings.

They will inform you of repairs that need to be made now, parts of the home that should be monitored for future repairs, and anything that poses a safety concern to you and your family.

The parts of your home the inspector will review include:

  • Roof

  • Exterior Walls

  • Foundation

  • Garage

  • Land grading

  • Plumbing

  • Electrical

  • Heating, ventilation, air conditioning

  • Appliances

There are some things your inspection won’t include. For example, mold, termite damage, and other issues that aren’t easily observable without causing damage might be missed by your inspector and will require a specialist.

After the inspection

Once the inspection is complete, you will have the chance to ask any remaining questions. You can review the findings of your inspection report and make decisions about how you want to handle any repairs that need to be made.

You may choose to ask the seller to make the repairs noted in your inspection report. If they refuse, you can withdraw from your contract at any time.


Ultimately, the choice will be yours what to do with the findings from the inspection. But having one can save you immeasurable money on impending repairs that you may not have been aware of.




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Posted by Annemarie Torcivia on 1/6/2020

If you're in the process of preparing your home for the real estate market, get ready to roll up your sleeves and make your home as irresistible as possible!

While this may sound like an enormous undertaking that you don't have the time or energy to tackle, remember one thing: When you put your home up for sale, there's a lot at stake!

Generally, the longer your house stays on the market, the less marketable it becomes. If potential buyers learn that your house has been on the market for longer than, say, a few months, one of the first questions they'll ask or think will be "What's wrong with it?" Once questions like that start arising, the overall appeal of your home begins to decline. As you can imagine, your ability to get the highest possible price for your house also weakens over time. That's why it's important to do everything possible to enhance the look and feel of your home.

Home Staging Counts

Although effective home staging can be a crucial aspect of selling your house quickly, there is a point at which diminishing returns may come into play. Few home sellers have unlimited time and money to invest in staging their home, and it's easy to go above and beyond what's actually necessary to secure a buyer.

There are dozens of variables that affect a house selling strategy, including the real estate market and the condition of your home. If it's a "buyers' market" and there are a lot of comparable houses for sale in your neighborhood, then you might have to work a little harder to make your home stand out and attract offers. If you're fortunate enough to be in a desirable area and not facing a lot of competition from other home sellers, then the law of supply and demand should work in your favor! However, it's still important to make the most of your property's curb appeal and the overall appearance of your home's interior.

The cost of home staging can range from a few hundred dollars to thousands, but your real estate agent can provide invaluable guidance on how to cost-effectlively maximize the "eye appeal" of your house and property. While perfection is generally an unattainable standard in home staging (or anything else), optimal results only come from putting your best foot forward.

Several words to remember and be guided by when preparing a house for sale are "immaculate", "spotless", "manicured" (lawn), "fresh" (looking and smelling), "updated", "well-maintained", and "charming". If prospective buyers are using those words and phrases to describe your home, then you know you're on the right track! Your agent can provide you with helpful insights and suggestions for making a great impression on potential buyers -- without having to spend more on home staging than necessary!





Posted by Annemarie Torcivia on 1/2/2020

Remodeled 3rd floor apartment in 3 family house. Above average living space. Hardwood floors throughout. Ample closet space . Additional storage in basement . Coin op laundry in basement. Rear porch. Certified treated for lead. 1 off street car parking. Close to Assembly Row, transportation, and all major highways. Easily available to show.

More Info on this Property | New Listing Alerts




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Posted by Annemarie Torcivia on 1/2/2020


152 Fellsway, Medford, MA 02155

Rental

$3,000
Price

6
Rooms
4
Beds
1
Baths
Remodeled 3rd floor apartment in 3 family house. Above average living space. Hardwood floors throughout. Ample closet space . Additional storage in basement . Coin op laundry in basement. Rear porch. Certified treated for lead. 1 off street car parking. Close to Assembly Row, transportation, and all major highways. Easily available to show.
Open House
No scheduled Open Houses

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Tags: Medford   Real Estate   02155   Rental  
Categories: New Homes  


Posted by Annemarie Torcivia on 12/30/2019

If you recently bought or sold a house, you likely will need to pack up your electronics and transport them to a new location in the near future. As such, it is important to pack your electronics correctly to reduce the risk of damage.

Now, let's take a look at three best practices for packing electronics.

1. Follow the Manufacturer's Instructions

In many instances, electronics manufacturers will offer tips and recommendations that you can use to pack your video game consoles, TVs and other electronics properly. Review any electronics product manuals at your disposal, and you can gain deep insights into how to pack these items.

If you lost an electronics product manual, there is no need to worry. Most manufacturers will post information on their respective websites about how to pack various electronics. Or, you can always contact the manufacturer directly or consult with an electronics retailer.

In addition, if you still have the original electronics box, you may want to use this box on moving day. The original box is the perfect size for your electronics, and as a result, will make it simple for you to pack and store your electronics safely until you complete your move.

2. Pick Up the Right Packing Materials

Tape, bubble wrap and other packing materials are essential, particularly for those who want to protect their electronics.

Visit a local convenience store or supermarket to pick up a wide range of packing materials. By doing so, you can purchase the packing items you need to properly secure your electronics.

Furthermore, if you need moving boxes for your electronics, a convenience store or supermarket may be able to help you out. Contact local convenience stores and supermarkets, and these businesses may be able to supply you with free boxes that they no longer need to store a variety of electronics.

3. Proceed with Caution

Most electronics consist of glass and other sensitive materials, so you'll want to do everything possible to protect these items.

It usually helps to wrap electronics in moving pads, sheets or light blankets. You also should wrap electronics in linen or clean paper to minimize the risk of dust damage.

For those who want expert help with packing electronics, you may want to hire a professional moving company. With this business at your disposal, you can receive comprehensive assistance as you prepare your electronics and other belongings for moving day.

Lastly, if you need extra help as you search for a moving company or try to buy or sell a house, you should work with a real estate agent.

Real estate agents are available in cities and towns nationwide. These housing market professionals can connect you with local moving experts, along with provide plenty of support throughout the homebuying or home selling process.

Ready to pack up your electronics? Use the aforementioned best practices, and you can keep your electronics safe as you get ready to relocate to a new address.




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